July 2014

* tyrants

"The truest characters of ignorance are vanity and pride and arrogance."
(Samuel Butler)

deer

The book that I recognize was very pivotal to becoming a reader for me was Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling, and then in high school it was just an explosion. I remember reading The Red Badge of Courage. It's of course when I read the Catcher in the Rye, To Kill a Mockingbird, for the first time - those were all books that I was introduced to in high school. Siddhartha I was introduced to in high school, [and] of course Beowulf, which I never really enjoyed. I don't think anybody really enjoys reading Beowulf. And then growing up in Sacramento, I had an emergent political consciousness, and I discovered writers like Tom Wolfe and Norman Mailer-of course the beat poets: Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac...and then there's James Joyce. I was educated by predominantly Irish Catholic nuns.

Did you grow to love any book through doing Reading Rainbow?

There are two that I always like to mention when given this opportunity. One is a book that boys tend to love called Enemy Pie by Derek Munson, and the other is a book for everybody, but I love recommending it for girls, and it's called Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman.

How did you develop this love of reading that you've carried through life?

This is all my mother's fault. My mother was an english teacher, and it was expected in her house that you read. She insisted upon it. Not only that, but my mother did something that I think is really, really important, and something I think we need to focus on in our current cultural climate.

As an avid reader, my mother always read in front of me when I was a child. I just absorbed that example that reading is part of being human. She always had several books going for her own enjoyment and entertainment, and I really believe that that is, in a large measure, responsible.

I grew up understanding the value of a relationship with the written word. It certainly has played itself out in my lifetime.

(LeVar Burton on Reading Rainbow,
Kickstarter Interview)


biggie

krishnamurti

In Stoicism we see the combination of pride and cowardice. One remains on the heights of pride as long as possible by always having cowardice as an escape. Pride is therefore like the extravagence of a bankrupt all during the time in which he knows he will declare himself a bankrupt.

It is not that pride changes into cowardice on the appearance of suicide; no, pride was all the time bolstered up with the thought of suicide; pride was cowardice.

Marry, and you will regret it. Do not marry, and you will also regret it. Marry or do not marry, you will regret it either way. Whether you marry or you do not marry, you will regret it either way. Laugh at the stupidities of the world, and you will regret it; weep over them, and you will also regret it. Laugh at the stupidities of the world or weep over them, you will regret it either way. Whether you laugh at the stupidities of the world or you weep over them, you will regret it either way.

Trust a girl, and you will regret it. Do not trust her, and you will also regret it. Trust a girl or do not trust her, you will regret it either way. Whether you trust a girl or do not trust her, you will regret it either way. Hang yourself, and you will regret it. Do not hang yourself, and you will also regret it. Hang yourself or do not hang yourself, and you will regret it either way. Whether you hang yourself or do not hang yourself, you will regret it either way.

This, gentleman, is the quintessence of all the wisdom of life.

(Soren Kierkegaard)

Tupac

Once upon a time there were a father and a son. A son is like a mirror in which the father sees himself and for the son in turn the father is like a mirror in which he sees himself in the time to come. Yet they seldom looked at each other in that way, for the cheerfulness of high spirited and lively conversation was their daily round. Only a few times did it happen that the father stopped, faced his son with a sorrowful countenance, looked at him and said 'Poor child, you are in a quiet despair'. Nothing more was said about it, how it was to be understood, how true it was. And the father believed that he was responsible for his son's depression, and the son believed that it was he who had caused the father's sorrow, but never a word was exchanged about this.

Then the father died. And the son saw much, heard much, experimented much, and was tried in various temptations, but he longed for only one thing, only one thing moved him--it was that word, and it was the voice of the father when he said it. Then the son also became an old man, but just as love devises everything, so longing and loss taught him--not of course to wrest any communication from the silence of eternity, but it taught him to imitate his father's voice until the likeness satisfied him. Then he did not look at himself in the mirror, as did the aged Swift, for the mirror was no more, but in loneliness he comforted himself by listening to his father's voice. 'Poor child, you are in a quiet despair". For the father was the only one who had understood him; and the father was the only intimate he had; that the intimacy was of such a nature that it remained the same whether the father was alive or dead."

(Soren Kierkegaard)