November 2013

* frozen

"You can't just let nature run wild."
(Walt Disney)

Provocation, leading to a violent response, followed by resolution-that's the pattern with many boys.

But that simple pattern is rare among girls. "The surface of a girl fight can be silent and smooth as a marble." observes Rachel Simmons. Tension can arise so subtly that even the girls themselves sometimes can't honestly tell you how it started. A violent response is seldom appropriate and seldom made, because the provocation may be hard to define:

- She ignored me in the hall even after I said hello to her.
- She sat with Karen instead of me at lunch, and she knows Karen hates me.
- She sighed when I spoke up in English class, like I had said something stupid.



Tensions can simmer and build for weeks or months, corroding a friendship until there is no friendship left.

Simmons uses the phrase "alternative aggression" to describe these ongoing wars among adolescent girls. It's a useful term because it reminds us that these ongoing tensions are a form of aggression. Parents sometimes don't recognize the damage that alternative aggression can cause. For one thing, the perpetrator is often a good girl polite to adults and clever at hiding her traces. A girl who victimizes other girls in this manner is often the most socially skilled and may even be one of the most popular girls - just the opposite of the typical boy bully.

Girl bullies are different from boy bullies. Boys who bully are often pathetic characters themselves. The male bully may have few friends, may be socially inept, may not be doing well in school. He picks on his victim as a way of improving his own status, at least in his own eyes.

(Leonard Sax, Why Gender Matters)

Hans

rog

"Parents sometimes don't recognize the damage that alternative aggression can cause. For one thing, the perpetrator is often a good girl polite to adults and clever at hiding her traces. A girl who victimizes other girls in this manner is often the most socially skilled and may even be one of the most popular girls - just the opposite of the typical boy bully."
(Leonard Sax, Why Gender Matters)



"Hans seemed to be a brave, friendly, and noble man at first sight. He asks a "weird" question to Anna about being married together."



"However later on in the story, Hans reveals his new self to Anna before he was about to kiss her, and is actually cruel, heartless, despicable, self-centered."



"Hans attempts to kill Queen Elsa, but Princess Anna was brave enough to stop him from killing her sister."



"Hans has a frozen heart."



"Hans is embittered by being ignored and overshadowed by his older brothers, and is willing to do anything, even treachery or murder, to gain respect and admiration."



"Hans, while being kind and friendly on the outside, is actually cruel and ruthless on the inside."



"Hans bears many similarities with Gaston from Beauty and the Beast, both are handsome, both are fiance of the female protagonist, both tried to woo them, both tried to kill a person close to the protagonist whom they considered a monster, both lead an army & both tried to become a hero by killing an innocent figure."

Kristoff

gene

"Kristoff Bjorgman, for while very gruff and tough on the outside, he's actually kind-hearted and caring on the inside."


"Rough around the edges, Kristoff's the strong, no-nonsense type, who follows his own set of rules. He may seem like a loner, but he always has his best friend by his side-a loyal and extremely mangy reindeer named Sven."


"Having spent his years without any real contact with lives outside of the trolls and Sven, Kristoff is a bit of an individualist, and acts as a loner. He can also be rather grumpy and selfish at times, as well as lazy.

But with all these flaws comes a heart of gold, as well, as the ice harvester has shown multiple times throughout the film that he has a loving heart, and deeply cares for those who treat him with sympathy and love in return, such as Sven, and later Anna.

His relationship with Sven is a perfect example of his soft side, as he's shown to put Sven over anyone else, going as far as to only saving Sven's carrots when his sleigh was seconds away from being destroyed, leaving the other much needed equipment aboard, feeling Sven's happiness and health is far more important.

Kristoff's loving side is brightly showcased during his time with Anna.

Throughout the start of the adventure, Kristoff shows disinterest in going to find Elsa or assisting Anna in conquering the mountains, but soon comes around through the "persuasion" of Sven.

And as the adventure continues, Kristoff grows attached to Anna's fun loving and sweet ways, becoming very protective of her, as well as loyal.

By the end of the film, Kristoff and Anna fall in love completely, though the mountain man shows to be quite the shy one around his sweetheart, once again showing his softer side."