April 21 2013

* realms

"The cry of the hyena and the loss of the goat are one."
(Nigerian)

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Scapegoat psychology: in certain groups, and in the family, there is sometimes one child, or one member of the family who takes on the role of doing all the evil, or all the embarassing things that the others would like to do, or fear to do, and don't dare to do. Then the others push that child or teen more and more into evil or embarassing actions. The criminal and the village idiot have a similar role. Each represent the negative redeemer. The criminal, like the idiot, redeems society from having to face it's own shadow. Because then they can say: it's that evil fellow who did the murder, or it's that silly fellow, the idiot, who blunders.

And this is relieving to the group, because they secretely wish to act criminal, or they fear making silly mistakes, they fear to be the dunce, or they secretely feel stupid about certain things.

So the great criminal, the great dunce, or the great whore, redeems the rest of the group of it's own folly and evil.

So if a person has a weak ego, then a stronger personality can push that weaker person into activities that most people desire to do, and then blame the weaker person for what the entire group wants to do, or has done before.

It's very important to know our shadow and to keep it out of the group phenomena.

Clergymen are very problematic natures, because the community expect them always to be mild, and friendly and helpful, and virtuous, but the poor man has a shadow too, naturally. So they can't live their shadow. And if they live it, the whole community howls against them. And so they spend their relationship to evil by projecting it onto other people, and preaching against it. Is that too poisonous?

(Marie Von Franz)

Shadow

rog

The shadow is not evil. It is the part of us that we repress, such as animal reactions - simple human reactions out of politeness. For people live their shadow, it makes them more accessible, natural and likeable. People who hide their shadow inflict an inferiority on their surroundings. They irritate their surroundings. And that's why one is so relieved when something nasty happens to them. And we say: thank god he's also only human. Psychoanalysts themselves try to be very correct with their patients, and I've noticed that when I've slipped, or produce a slip off during the analytical hour, the patient can reproach me, and it improves our relationship. Their sentiment is: "Afterall, Von Franz is only human." And now I feel above her and I'll pardon her. And that's a good feeling. And then one has a more natural human being to human being relationship. The shadow is really our best social function. It integrates us. With our shadow, we our man among men, human to human. So the shadow is something we should love and accept, but we often supress it. The more that the people are righteous, and therefore, never live their shadow side, the more they project it. The others are always the evil doers. And so they live in a constant righteous indignation. Hunting down their own shadow in the form of the other person.

(Marie Von Franz)

 

Persecutor

gene

Persecution means that something always wants to come to us. The only way to meet a persecuting demon is to turn around and say, here I am, what do you want from me? Then the nightmarish pursuer generally changes faces. It simply represents that we have turned away from some part of our psyche, and therefore, it runs after us, it wants to get at us - but we don't want it.

If we reject something in us, then it becomes destructive to us. If we don't reject it, in a friendly manner, ask, what do you want? Then the demonic face becomes more amenable.

The shadow is a person of the same sex appearing in dreams. They usually have an opposite or inferior quality to ego of the dreamer. The shadow can be our best enemy, or our other side.

On the divine centre on which all order and all organization stems. The dream is the letter that the self writes to the self every night. The dream tells us, go a bit to the left, and go a bit to the right.

(Marie Von Franz)